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Burntwood 4-year-old bullied because of his 'alien' head





  • Nate Williams, from Staffordshire, was born with an abnormal-shaped head 
  • But doctors still remain baffled as to what caused his underdeveloped skull
  • It has also left him with cataracts, a hole in the heart and breathing problems
  • However, experts are unsure how long he has left to live from the condition

By Stephen Matthews For Mailonline

Published: 05:38 EST, 17 February 2017 | Updated: 05:47 EST, 17 February 2017

A four-year-old boy is often bullied by other children for looking like an 'alien' because of a mysterious condition.

Nate Williams, from Burntwood, Staffordshire, was born with an abnormal-shaped head, but doctors still remain baffled as to why.

Not only has he been plagued with an underdeveloped skull, but he also suffers from cataracts and has breathing difficulties.  

And this has caused the boy, who attends a special-needs school for disabled children, to endure torment from other youngsters.

Experts are unsure how long he has left to live, forcing his family to make as many memories as possible.  

Nate Williams was born with an abnormal-shaped head, but doctors remain baffled as to why Nate Williams was born with an abnormal-shaped head, but doctors remain baffled as to why

Nate Williams was born with an abnormal-shaped head, but doctors remain baffled as to why

His mother, Jo, 45, said: 'Some children have called him an alien, but teachers sat them down and explained he is different to others.

'He can't walk on his own, run, or climb like other little boys, but he's determined to do what all the other kids do, and so are we.

'We don't know what Nate's prognosis is, so we want to make as many memories as we can with him, to make as much of his life as we can.

'Nate is at the top of the class and is such character. He's such a happy kid, who just gets on with life and never complains.' 

At her 20-week scan at the Birmingham Women's Hospital, Ms Williams found out that her pregnancy was going to become difficult.

Doctors noticed the shape of Nate's head wasn't normal, forcing them to test for Edwards' syndrome - a serious, genetic condition with a low survival rate.

Not only has he been plagued with an underdeveloped skull, but he also suffers from cataracts and has breathing difficulties Not only has he been plagued with an underdeveloped skull, but he also suffers from cataracts and has breathing difficulties

Not only has he been plagued with an underdeveloped skull, but he also suffers from cataracts and has breathing difficulties

And they also discovered he had a small hole in his heart. 

Ms Williams and her partner, Andy, 32, were offered a termination because of the severity of his misshaped head.

However, they refused as 'there was no way' they were giving him up because they had already become so attached. 

Some children have called him an alien, but teachers sat them down and explained he is different to others
His mother, Jo Williams, 45

To their relief, the test showed their baby didn't have the deadly condition.

But he did have Klinefelter syndrome, a more common genetic disorder that can cause boys to produce less testosterone than normal. 

The family were told it wasn't life-threatening but his learning would be delayed. He would also need testosterone injections before puberty.  

From then onwards, Ms Williams was deemed a high-risk pregnancy and needed a scan every two weeks.

At 34 weeks, she was induced at Burton Hospital after doctors discovered she didn't have enough amniotic fluid, putting Nate at high risk. 

And this has caused the boy, who attends a special school for disabled children, to endure bullying from other youngsters (pictured with his mother, Jo, 45) And this has caused the boy, who attends a special school for disabled children, to endure bullying from other youngsters (pictured with his mother, Jo, 45)

And this has caused the boy, who attends a special school for disabled children, to endure bullying from other youngsters (pictured with his mother, Jo, 45)

Experts are unsure how long he has left to live (pictured using his walker to get around at school) Experts are unsure how long he has left to live (pictured using his walker to get around at school)
His family are now trying to make as many memories as possible (pictured in summer 2016) His family are now trying to make as many memories as possible (pictured in summer 2016)

Experts are unsure how long he has left to live, forcing his family to make as many memories as possible (pictured left using his walker to get around and right in summer 2016)

Not having enough amniotic fluid can lead to infections and because Nate was so small, doctors needed to act quickly.

But two days into labour, and one centimetre dilated, she was given an emergency Caesarean section because he was becoming distressed in the womb.

Ms Williams added: 'I was just so desperately hoping our baby was going to be okay. We didn't know what to expect. Doctors thought that he might not make it.'

 Born at just 34 weeks, Nate weighed a tiny 2lb 6oz and was kept in hospital for eight weeks  Born at just 34 weeks, Nate weighed a tiny 2lb 6oz and was kept in hospital for eight weeks

 Born at just 34 weeks, Nate weighed a tiny 2lb 6oz and was kept in hospital for eight weeks

But when Nate was finally delivered, weighing a tiny 2lb 6oz, his cry gave his parents some hope.

Ms Williams said: 'He let out a cry and then we both started crying too. He looked so well, even though he was so small.

'But we were still very worried he wouldn't make it through the first night. Because he was so tiny, he was a high risk already.

'He was wrapped in a little blanket, with a hat on. He looked perfect. So tiny, but with his little nose and mouth he just looked like a perfect bundle to us. 

'We gave him a kiss and he looked so peaceful and content.' 

As his condition causes him to make less testosterone, Nate will need injections at puberty As his condition causes him to make less testosterone, Nate will need injections at puberty

As his condition causes him to make less testosterone, Nate will need injections at puberty

Despite his condition, doctors are unsure why Nate looks so different to other children Despite his condition, doctors are unsure why Nate looks so different to other children

Despite his condition, doctors are unsure why Nate looks so different to other children

Doctors quickly transferred him to the neonatal unit, giving Ms Williams some time to think.

As she replayed Nate's birth in her mind, she started to fear something wasn't right with her newborn.

WHAT IS KLINEFELTER SYNDROME?

Around one in 600 newborn boys are born with Klinefelter syndrome.

The condition means sufferers are born with an extra X chromosome.

This happens randomly during the formation of the egg or sperm, the extra chromosome is not inherited.

Females born with an extra X chromosome, is called Triple X syndrome, which is slightly different.

Adult males with the condition may not be able to produce enough testosterone, the hormone responsible for the development of male characteristics.

The result is low energy and sex drive, a lack of muscle and too much body fat around the middle.

Many men will live their life unaware of their chromosome variation.

But in some cases, boys will reach puberty and because of a lack of testosterone, they may grow breasts, and notice their small testicles and penis and a reduced amount of facial and body hair.

Source: NHS Choices

She added: 'His fingers and the shape of his heard didn't look quite right.

'Andy didn't notice anything, but I think it must have been a mother's instinct. I was just desperate to see him.' 

Sadly, her instincts were right and doctors discovered a catalogue of things wrong with Nate, including an undeveloped skull, cataracts and breathing difficulties. 

Ms Williams was sent home after two days, but returned to the hospital every day to be with Nate, who was kept in for eight weeks.

But just two days after being allowed home, he was rushed back into hospital with bronchiolitis, a common lung infection in children. 

After a further six weeks in hospital, doctors said he would need to be on oxygen constantly because of his situation. 

Doctors are still baffled as to why Nate, who attends a school for children with disabilities, looks so different to other children.

They don't believe his appearance is related to Klinefelter syndrome. 

The family have been unable to take Nate on a foreign holiday, because of the cost to insure him.

So they set up a fundraising page to raise £2,000 to take him on a cruise around the Canary Islands. 

Ms Williams added: 'It would mean so much to us to take Nate on a family holiday. He's been through so much and deserves something that all other kids get.'

Anyone wanting to donate can do so here. 

After finally going home, Nate was rushed back to hospital two days later with  bronchiolitis After finally going home, Nate was rushed back to hospital two days later with  bronchiolitis

After finally going home, Nate was rushed back to hospital two days later with  bronchiolitis

Nate's condition means his insurance is too expensive for them to afford a family holiday  Nate's condition means his insurance is too expensive for them to afford a family holiday 

Nate's condition means his insurance is too expensive for them to afford a family holiday 

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Larry Whyte
Larry Whyte

He is a leading authority on business trends including ‘big data’, self-employment and the social media revolution. He’s the author of the award-winning book, Marketing Shortcuts for the Self-Employed (2011, Wiley) and a regular speaker for Bloomberg TV. He has spoken about global mega trends, big data and the social media revolution at conferences and business events around the world .

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