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Behemoth the huntsman handed into Australian Reptile Park





  • Behemoth the huntsman was this week handed into The Australian Reptile Park
  • The 16cm creepy crawly has been pictured dwarfing a regular-sized huntsman
  • Staff at the park believe the huge huntsman could be the world's largest
  • Last year, Charlotte the huntsman went viral after being found in Queensland

By Nelson Groom for Daily Mail Australia

Published: 03:31 EST, 17 February 2017 | Updated: 05:45 EST, 17 February 2017

Bad news for those who came out of hiding after Charlotte the huntsman crawled over the globe online – there's a new mammoth spider in town.

Last November, Charlotte sent the internet into a spin after she was snapped on a broom head in a farm in Queensland's Brisbane Valley.

Now, a new creepy crawly dubbed Behemoth has clambered into The Australian Reptile Park in Somersby, NSW. And staff are wagering he gives his female predecessor 'a run for her money.'

Spine-chilling snapshots show the 16cm arachnid dwarfing a regular-sized huntsman, before stretching its hulking frame around a tree trunk.

Behemoth the huntsman was this week handed into The Australian Reptile Park Behemoth the huntsman was this week handed into The Australian Reptile Park

Behemoth the huntsman was this week handed into The Australian Reptile Park

Staff at the park believe the huge huntsman could be the world's largest Staff at the park believe the huge huntsman could be the world's largest

Staff at the park believe the huge huntsman could be the world's largest

The Australian Reptile Park's General Manager, Tim Faulkner, said Behemoth is closer size is closer to a bird-eating spider than his own brethren.

'When compared to a giant bird-eating spider, the size of Behemoth becomes obvious.'

He admitted huge arachnids are widely feared – but believes they get a bad rap.

'Huntsman spiders often get a bad rap. The species is not dangerous they just come across quite scary.'

Their danger, however, lies in their formidable appearance – and penchant for popping out when least expected.

'Huntsman spiders tend to inhabit many places that humans do and will pop up when you least expect them. Such times are in your car when driving or in your room when watching TV.'

Last year, Charlotte the huntsman went viral after being discovered on a farm in Queensland Last year, Charlotte the huntsman went viral after being discovered on a farm in Queensland

Last year, Charlotte the huntsman went viral after being discovered on a farm in Queensland

Specialists at the time told Daily Mail Australia the huntsman was a green giant species with a legspan of 20 centimetres Specialists at the time told Daily Mail Australia the huntsman was a green giant species with a legspan of 20 centimetres

Specialists at the time told Daily Mail Australia the huntsman was a green giant species with a legspan of 20 centimetres

Spine-chilling snapshots show 16cm creepy crawly dwarfing a regular-sized huntsman, Spine-chilling snapshots show 16cm creepy crawly dwarfing a regular-sized huntsman,

Spine-chilling snapshots show 16cm creepy crawly dwarfing a regular-sized huntsman,

The Australian Reptile Park's General Manager, Tim Faulkner, said Behemoth is closer size is closer to a bird-eating spider than his own brethren The Australian Reptile Park's General Manager, Tim Faulkner, said Behemoth is closer size is closer to a bird-eating spider than his own brethren

The Australian Reptile Park's General Manager, Tim Faulkner, said Behemoth is closer size is closer to a bird-eating spider than his own brethren

After Charlotte shot to stardom last year, specialists told Daily Mail Australia the huntsman was a green giant species with a legspan of 20 centimetres.

This estimate would suggest Behemoth still has catching up to do before claiming the world title.  

It's believed she grew to a fearsome stature gorging on bugs, safe from predators, in an old farmer's shed.

Australian Reptile Park's Michael Tate, also known as 'Ranger Mick', told Daily Mail Australia Charlotte was a 'gobsmacker.'

'She's an exceptionally large female. I've been working at the Park for 25 years and she would have to be the biggest one I've seen. She's a gobsmacker.' 

 


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Larry Whyte
Larry Whyte

He is a leading authority on business trends including ‘big data’, self-employment and the social media revolution. He’s the author of the award-winning book, Marketing Shortcuts for the Self-Employed (2011, Wiley) and a regular speaker for Bloomberg TV. He has spoken about global mega trends, big data and the social media revolution at conferences and business events around the world .

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