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World's most wanted man is dead: Rookie Italian policeman guns down fugitive Berlin killer screaming 'Allahu Akbar' after he shoots his fellow officer when they confront him in Milan as the Tunisian's ISIS suicide video is revealed





World's most wanted man is dead: Rookie Italian policeman guns down fugitive Berlin killer screaming 'Allahu Akbar' after he shoots his fellow officer when they confront him in Milan as the Tunisian's ISIS suicide video is revealed World's most wanted man is dead: Rookie Italian policeman guns down fugitive Berlin killer screaming 'Allahu Akbar' after he shoots his fellow officer when they confront him in Milan as the Tunisian's ISIS suicide video is revealed

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Anis Amri, the Tunisian national suspected of carrying out the brutal truck attack that left at least 12 people dead in Berlin earlier this week, was killed in a shootout with Italian police early Friday, authorities said.

Amri, 24, was stopped for a standard customs check in a suburb outside Milan around 9 a.m. local time, according to several local media reports. When border police asked him for identification, Amri allegedly pulled out a handgun from a backpack and began firing while repeatedly shouting “Allah Akbar” — the Arabic term for “God is great.”

Officers returned fire, mortally wounding the suspected terrorist. At least one officer suffered non-life threatening injuries in the exchange of gunfire, police said.

Italian police cordon off an area around Amri's body after the fatal shootout with police. 

Marco Minniti, Italy's interior minister, confirmed during a Friday morning press conference that the dead man was Amri. 

"There is absolutely no doubt that the person who was killed was Anis Amri, the suspect in the terrorist attack in Berlin," Minniti said. 

Amri had been on the run since Monday, when he plowed a hijacked 25-ton truck into a busy Christmas bazaar next to the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church in Central Berlin, injuring nearly 50 people in addition to the dozen dead. The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack, calling Amri a "soldier" without identifying him by name. 

Amri became the Europe's most-wanted fugitive and triggered a continent-wide manhunt after the bloody attack, which drew eerie parallels to an attack carried out by another Tunisian national in Nice, France over the summer that left nearly 90 people dead. ISIS claimed responsibility for that attack as well.

Amri had been stopped for a standard customs check before he was fatally shot by police. 

Authorities in Germany offered a $105,000 reward earlier this week for information leading to Amri's arrest, warning he could be "violent and armed." They also revealed he had been on counterterrorism watch lists for months, had been denied asylum over the summer and was due to be deported.  

It was not immediately clear how Amri made it to the suburbs of Milan, which is almost 650 miles away from Berlin.

Investigators looking into Amri's past say he has used at least six different names and three nationalities since traveling to Europe from Tunisia in the wake of the 2011 Arab Spring uprisings.

Amri initially spent time in Italy, where he served three and a half years in prison for setting a fire at a refugee center and making threats. He was transferred among diferrent prisons over bad conduct, with records saying he taunted inmates and tried to spark insurrections — but Italian authorities apparently detected no signs of radicalization.          


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World's most wanted man is dead: Rookie Italian policeman guns down fugitive Berlin killer screaming 'Allahu Akbar' after he shoots his fellow officer when they confront him in Milan as the Tunisian's ISIS suicide video is revealed
Dave Arnold

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